Social Pedagogy and Social Work in the UK: The meeting of two cultures as seen from a continental European perspective

Número 26. EL TEMA: ES Y TS. 20/2/2018
Autor: Verónica Pérez, Social Pedagogue, trainer and consultant, Associate with Jacaranda Development. Simon Thomas Johr, social pedagogue at Adoption and Fostering Recruitment and Training Team, Staffordshire County Council..

PALABRAS CLAVE
Educación Social Pedagogía Social Infancia Trabajo Social Acogimiento Aprendizaje Relaciones



NOTA:
Artículo en dos versisiones. Versión original en lengua inglesa en la primera parte y versión en lengua castellana en la segunda parte
Versión íntegra igualmente en lengua castellana en
Pedagogía Social y Trabajo Social en el Reino Unido: El encuentro de dos culturas visto desde una perspectiva europea continental 
 



Social Pedagogy and Social Work in the UK:

The meeting of two cultures as seen from a continental European perspective

____

Pedagogía Social y Trabajo Social en el Reino Unido:

El encuentro de dos culturas visto desde una perspectiva europea continental
 


 

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to understand how social pedagogy could be integrated within the professional social care field in the UK. It looks at social pedagogy relationship with social work through the unique experience that social pedagogues from different parts of Europe[1] had during the Head, Heart, Hands programme (HHH)[2], led by The Fostering Network. The programme aimed to demonstrate how introducing social pedagogy into foster care could have a positive impact on British fostering services. Social pedagogy strives to understand the sociological context and how this can influence the professional practice, impact our and others thinking and actions. The common thread is to explore the encounter of the two cultures that happened throughout the national programme and the learning and reflections that stemmed from it. To enthuse and benefit the wide range of professionals that work in the field of social care in general and fostering in particular, providing some ‘food for thought’ and concrete ideas on how social pedagogy can be integrated with social work to contribute to improve the quality of care in the UK.

 

The starting point of the paper is to define social pedagogy in the context of the HHH programme; then it looks into the different social backgrounds in childcare for the two societal models concerned, reflecting upon some of its similarities and differences, as well as the different levels of professionalization in childcare in both traditions. Following outlines the findings that could support the merging of the two ways of working, to reinforce some current social work practices and offer new understandings for enhancing the quality of care in the UK.

This article findings will be complemented with a future paper that will be focusing on the empirical aspects and learnings of the HHH programme: Social Pedagogy in the UK. An experience in Fostering. Reflections on the learning from the Head, Heart, Hands Programme’.
 

Brief description of social pedagogy in the context of the HHH Programme

Social pedagogy and social work have in common that they are professions that attract vocational practitioners with a strong advocacy for social justice; often the work is a ‘calling’. There is an ethical motivation in joining the profession in order to make a difference in society, in making the world a fairer one.

The HHH programme’s social pedagogues definition of social pedagogy is based on the belief, understanding and knowledge that one can positively change or influence disadvantaged situations through educational methods. Within those educational methods used, the practitioners are aware of themselves being the main ‘tool’ in their work. This requires to be critical and self-reflective, to be aware of their own values, beliefs and their own emotional triggers. This means that the social pedagogues have a consistent and clear Haltung, which is not only part of their individual professional life, but also a part of the pedagogues’ personality. The German word Haltungroughly translates as stance, ethos or mind set and refers to the extent to which a person guides their actions by their ethical orientation and lives their values in the everyday(Eichsteller & Holthoff, 2011). Haltung describes how our actions and thinking is guided by our convictions and also means that the practitioner needs to be congruent / authentic in order to be credible. A social pedagogue will try to intervene as little as possible, but as much as needed by gaining an understanding of the client’s life-world (Thiersch, 2005). Under this description, the pedagogue aims to work in a strength-based manner, which empowers the client, and uses a holistic approach, which considers the whole person as well as the system around them. Following this understanding, the social pedagogue would have mutual respect, trust, unconditional appreciation, believing that all human beings are equal with rich and extraordinary potential and consider them competent, resourceful and active agents. There is an awareness of the wider system and culture we are in, and we see the work in interdependence with society.

In relation to the relevance that the wider system is given in social pedagogy, the article will now explore the main characteristics of childcare in Britain, in contrast with those in continental Europe.
 

1. Understanding childcare development in the Anglo-Saxon and continental European traditions: The influence of society and culture

There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela


The view of the child and its socialisation

There are fundamental similarities by which continental European societies look after their most vulnerable children and young people. The United Kingdom has a long tradition in social work while a tradition of social pedagogy was also developed within continental Europe. In both, safety and wellbeing are at the centre of legislation and working practice. At the same time, there are differences in how children and young people are socialised and educated in continental European countries and what is considered the mainstream approach in the United Kingdom. These differences are primarily related to different social constructions of the ‘image of the child’. The latter refers to what kind of value children have in their society and which expectations and aspirations they live under. The attention paid to this idea has varied, for example, the sociology of childhood is important in some fields but rarely acknowledged in others, including policymaking. The image of the child in a determined place and time is a social construct, “always present and influential, but in policymaking, they are usually implicit, and therefore not discussed” (Moss, P. 2010).

To understand the different cultural views of the value society places on children and young people it is important to go back to the industrial revolution to trace the start of changes in how infancy/childhood are understood and viewed in modern Europe. This is closely linked to the development of formal education for children in different countries.

As the country where the irreversible transformational process of industrialisation started, the United Kingdom experienced great social and economic changes that brought up a new range of social problems, some of which affected mainly children and young people. These included child labour (Griffin, 2016), juvenile crime (White, 2016), poverty - especially among the working class - and orphanhood (Richardson, 2016). Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, new thinking emerged in continental Europe. Schools and formal education spread, and a number of philosophers and educators started to look at the aims and essence of educating the young, focusing on the nature and needs of children, and developing a progressive holistic understanding of growth and learning. One such thinker and philosopher was Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In his book “Emile or On Education” (1762) Rousseau explored the impact of socialisation and formal education on children’s ‘inherently good nature’ (Doyle and Smith, 2007).
 


Education and childcare in continental Europe were constructed and guided by principals such as individual agency, freedom and self-discipline (Entwistle, 1970). Social pedagogy was one influence in this development. Educators, politicians and social reformers have since built upon these developments which focused on the following: the idea of considering children as active agents in their development; the need to understand each child as a whole being; the importance of appropriate environments where they can develop to their full potential; and the vital role of an individualised and holistic approach to children rearing on the children’s overall wellbeing and achievements. Notions that today are considered as essentially social pedagogical, influenced how education and childcare were constructed in continental European countries.

This cultural shift was part of the construction of an image of the child as resourceful, creative, active, and able; of children as active agents in their own lives, being respected for their concerns as well as their skills, contributing to their ‘sense of agency’ (Stein, 2007). In the newly formed welfare systems and child care services, these views meant the prevalence of strengths-focused approaches, with a preventative orientation at their base. An example of this can be found in the work of Loris Malaguzzi, founder of municipal early childhood centres in Italy, which had at their heart a pedagogic philosophy for the early years that conceptualised children as ‘rich’, competent and active agents, arguing that “the child has ‘a hundred languages’, a hundred hands, a hundred thoughts, a hundred ways of thinking, of playing, of speaking” (Malaguzzi, cited in Edwards, Gandini and Forman, 1998; as cited in Moss and Cameron, 2011: 37).
 


As used in continental Europe, the word ‘pedagogy’ relates to the overall support of and for children’s development, whereas the ‘social’ component refers to society’s role and responsibility in this task. In pedagogy, caring and educating in its formal and informal meanings, meet each other, they are intrinsically related.

To put it another way, pedagogy is about bringing up children, it is ‘education’ in the broadest sense of that word. Indeed, in French and other languages with a Latin base (such as Italian and Spanish) terms like l’éducation convey this broader sense, and are interchangeable with expanded notions of pedagogy as used in Germanic and Nordic countries” (Petrie et al, 2009: 3).

This view of the child, influenced by a more social pedagogical thinking, can be contrasted with what has been generally prevalent in Anglo-Saxon cultural contexts, where a more problematised view of childhood has prevailed, with children considered as different and having to behave as adults as soon as possible. When in the care of the state, or coming from economically and socially deprived environments, children are commonly seen as traumatised, handicapped and even delinquent. A view that creates a problem-focused approach within formal education and institutionalised care environments, with a mainly curative orientation, that is, to restore children/young people to their natural, obedient self (James and Prout, 2015).

British legislation of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which still influences modern-day legislation, reinforced the fact that children:

were not ‘free’ agents; drew attention to the child-parent relationship with the latter being expected to exercise control and discipline; and emphasised the danger of those in need of ‘care and protection’ becoming delinquents” (Walvin, 1982 and May, 173; in James and Prout, 2015: 43).

The emphasis in residential and foster care in the UK is often to keep children safe and healthy, with the main aim to equip children with essential life-skills in a normalised process - similar to that of children not in the care system -, by focusing on achieving good outcomes. In particular, family life, health and education are considered as being the key factors for the future integration of children and young people, so they are then fully able to contribute positively to society. The dilemma lays on the over-protective nature of many fostering and residential environments that was observed during the HHH programme. It derived from an often risk averse professional guidance and practice (Milligan, 2011), which provides restricted opportunities for children to grow and develop in the same way as their peers not in care. They have limited scope to experience activities that support their confidence facing daily challenges. This also hinders the process of gaining useful skills for a successful transition to independence and adulthood in the future.
 


On the other hand, a social pedagogical framework emphasises learning facilitated by everyday life activities and events, with age-appropriate risks seen as opportunities for renewed understanding and discovery. This is not ‘set up’, but it happens spontaneously as children are encouraged to help themselves, to be compassionate and empathetic, to work together as a team, thus learning key skills they will need for their future life as inter-dependent and autonomous adults. From a social pedagogical perspective, we speak of the notion of the ‘rich’ child (Malaguzzi; cited in Moss and Cameron, 2011), in contrast to the ‘child in need’ of dominant UK child welfare discourses, social pedagogy focuses on strengths and potentials, rather than deficits (Smith, 2012).
 

Professionalisation in childcare

Another area that can further this understanding is that of the professional childcare sector, and how it has been differently constructed in countries that have a tradition in social pedagogy, compared to those who do not have the approach as part of the roots of their welfare systems. In most continental European countries, we find social pedagogues - in some countries known as social educators -, within multidisciplinary teams across the different areas of the social care system. For example, early years provision, youth work, working with children in residential care, schools, in resources for adults with learning or physical disabilities, working with disadvantaged groups, supporting the elderly or even in the business sector as wellbeing support for staff.
 


Another contextual difference in the professional sector is that in many continental European countries it is more common to have mainly residential provisions for children and young people in care; with fostering coexisting alongside but to a much lesser extent than it is used in the UK, where fostering is a common form of placement for the majority of children and young people that enter the care system. We can see this by noticing the percentage of children who are in a group-care type of placement across four countries: England, 14% (in 2010); Denmark, 47% (in 2007); Germany, 54% (in 2005); Italy, 48% (in 2007) (Ainsworth and Thoburn, 2013). It is important to note that perception and context of residential services across Europe varies. In most continental European countries, the staff in residential services have university degrees in social or educational sciences (for example social pedagogy or other relevant subjects such as psychology, teaching or social work) and are fully trained prior to working with a vulnerable population. The services are often seen as supportive rather than ‘last resort’ or ‘punishment for bad behaviour’. Germany has a variety of foster placements hence foster carer roles. If you want to provide a specialist, foster placement for children and young people with particular needs one has to have a qualification. However, this doesn’t apply to general foster carers.
 


At the time of writing this paper the UK system does not specify a requirement to have certain qualifications in order to be employed as a foster carer or as a residential care worker. The preapproval requirements for foster carers are national minimum standards; which practitioners have to demonstrate they can abide by and provide. After this, all foster carers have to complete the compulsory “Training Support and Development Standards for Foster Care” (TSD) within 12 months of being approved. Apart from these national requirements and the TSD, each organisation/agency/service sets their own priorities in terms of the knowledge they require their practitioners to have, usually in relation to specific models or approaches. In the experience of the HHH programme, some of the more common were attachment theories and restorative practice. Specific knowledge is offered through training or other learning opportunities. Scotland is in the process of adding mandatory training for foster carers and the Scottish Social Service Council is in the process of revising and adding mandatory training for residential staff. At the time of writing this paper, it has not yet been established.

“The research showed that, in England, children in residential care have more severe and disturbed backgrounds than in the other countries studied. Yet the training and education of staff in England is at a much lower level than in those countries” (Petrie et al, 2005:5).

 

 

Source: compiled by the authors


2. The integration of the two ways of working in practice

This part of the paper will explore the integration of the two cultural approaches, focusing on how social pedagogy and social work can jointly contribute to the quality of care in the UK. Firstly, it looks at how quality of care is understood within the British context, and then it explores the relevance of a shared value base by practitioners. Following this, how the organisational and managerial levels can be aligned under a social pedagogical way of working is examined. The final aspect explored is how the different focus on processes and outcomes under the social pedagogy lens and the pivotal role of relationships can be integrated into practice.
 

Quality of care: what is it?

There is not a shared definition of quality of care in the British context. As mentioned above, to be approved as a foster carer depends on fulfilling the national minimum standards and the criteria established by each organisation or agency. The result of this diversity is that there are multiple definitions of what makes good quality foster care or what is needed to work in fostering. Having said that, there are some commonalities as there is a large percentage of organisations that use The Fostering Network ‘Skills to foster’ training and often Coram BAAF's (Adoption and Fostering Academy) assessment tools which gives a more united approach to the pre-approval process and means that the preparation training has a very similar baseline across these organisations. At the same time, the British institution of fostering and adoption panels each comprises a diverse team of professionals, enabling a consistent and comprehensive approach to foster carer's approval. National organisations like The Fostering Network and Foster Talk enable connectivity through their national campaigns, up to date online resources as well as a helpline for foster carers. Other unifying criteria are the reference guides for the standards of working with children: “Every Child Matters” for England and “Getting it right for every child” in Scotland.

From their experience in the HHH demonstration programme, the social pedagogues found that by integrating social pedagogy into the working culture of the different organisations involved, some key elements of the approach were particularly useful and became valuable agents of change. Some of these elements are explored here, some other aspects (the different approach to risk, the relevance of reflective practice), will be analysed in the mentioned future paper.
 

The need for ethical orientation: a shared value base

Social pedagogues consider important to share a clear and unified value base with those who they work with, this serves as a reference to sustain and guide practice for practitioners sharing a working environment or professional responsibilities with a specific group. When a social pedagogue makes decisions, she has to use value-based assessments, combined with theory applied to her practice through reflection in action, and this is done in dialogue with others, the client and the other colleagues or professionals. It is rather about ethics and values than methods and techniques (Storø, 2013). Thus, social pedagogy is a combination of theory, research and Haltung. During the HHH programme, the social pedagogues noticed a need for further dialogue around the value base of practice. This situation contributed at times to a certain degree of inconsistency in practice that was also a result of the confusion over continuing governmental changes and political and financial agendas brought to the field.

It is relevant to note that all qualified social workers in the UK have a code of practice and ethics. From the experience throughout the programme, there can be different understandings of these shared values, or how to put them into practice, or assumptions of the kind ‘we all think the same’. Ongoing dialogue and reflection could be a useful resource to explore this more thoroughly. Constructing a shared ethical foundation is one of the best investments for the future that can be made in order to support coherence and stability in decision-making processes for children and their families.
 

An organisational and managerial shift: sharing of decision making

Social pedagogues value practicing in organisations with flat hierarchies and to have an inclusive and democratic leadership. This is practiced by leaders by actively seeking employee’s opinions and input into decisions. They provide space and resources for co-creating processes and encourage employees to be autonomous. An example can be found in some continental European residential care settings “where the norm is democratic decision making within relatively flat hierarchies, allowing staff to take on a higher level of responsibility, commensurate with their qualifications” (Cameron et al. 2011: 9). However, social pedagogues also recognise the need for management, for someone to make a final decision. It is not easy to find the right balance between employee participation and management. Ideally, they go hand in hand.
 


Important organisation wide decisions are made in dialogue between leadership and staff. Both parties help each other to keep the basic principles of the organisation alive. These principles are outlined in the service concept written by leadership and staff together. This not only involves the whole team it also increases the willingness to live up to the concept. In Britain, the HHH social pedagogues saw that the direction and principles of their organisations were often decided by the management and then handed down to all employees to realise them. In some of the organisations, social pedagogues had no input into these. This made it difficult for many staff members to identify with these values and to actively promote and own them.
 


Accepting challenges and conflict leads to more open, transparent and dialogical communication within the system by sharing decision making equally between professionals, parents, children and young people. The participation of children and young people in decision making in social pedagogical thinking is observed at all times, because the social pedagogues are working according to the principle of helping people to help themselves (Storø, 2013). In other words, social pedagogy works towards creating the context that facilitates empowerment. Social pedagogues would explore a wide diversity of strategies to include the child’s or young person’s voice in decision-making processes about their lives. Children’s social workers will also strive to make the children’s voice heard in the decisions that are made about their life. The main difference is - from the HHH programme’s social pedagogues’ point of view - that the system is not always conductive to bringing the child’s wishes to the table, or that the consultation processes and participation in decision-making can be a rather tokenistic exercise. This also applies to including the parent has and foster carer’s views, particularly when they can be systematically excluded from the process.
 

Learning & Development: an ongoing process

A shared aim in the UK foster care is to be able to retain foster carers and social work staff, and it is expected that they develop professionally. It was found that in the field of fostering there are many training opportunities available for foster carers and professionals. While one HHH site encouraged foster carers to write reflective accounts about the training they attended, the majority did not check if and how the newly acquired knowledge was linked to practice. There are high expectations placed on how foster carers meet care standards, but at the same time, they are often not seen as professionals on an equal stance with social workers and other practitioners, being required to be very flexible and engaging in what they do, with the main focus in evidencing the outcomes of children in their care.
 


Social pedagogy can support the emphasis in quality of learning and training, making connections between theory and practice through reflection, following up with experiential sessions or ‘reality tests’ and reviewing the knowledge afterwards. This promotes a bigger possibility for embedding whatever learning has been promoted in their daily practice. Learning and development needs to be on an ongoing basis. The social pedagogues experience in the programme shows that this approach to training directly supports the retention of foster carers and staff, because it allows people to make mistakes and learn from them. There is not a right or wrong way to do things or a universal solution for their challenges, there are just stages in a learning journey, and therefore there is no need for blame.

Cameron (2016), in her meta-analysis of several evaluation reports, identifies that social pedagogy learning and development initiatives offer the opportunity for the workplace to see itself as a ‘learning organisation’, where practitioners are more reflective, and give more time and relevance to their own and the client’s learning. The conceptualisation of a learning organisation here, relates to where “learning is valuable, continuous, and most effective when shared and that every experience is an opportunity to learn” (Kerka cited in Smith, 2001, 2007).
 

Source: compiled by the authors


The process as important as the outcomes

There is wide recognition of the relevance of outcomes to monitor and evaluate the quality of care provided in the UK’s foster care practice as well as in social pedagogical traditions. However, the ‘how’ to achieve this differs. In mainland Europe, the idea of Immanuel Kant is widely spread in the working approach. His message is that an action is justified if it is in accordance with specific, socially approved moral principles. In contrary, the British/American approach gives a certain liberty to professionals and institutions to follow the principle that a good outcome can justify even a questionable process to get there (Merkel cited in Engel, 2016).
 


The British social care system can be highly procedural. The working practice of professionals is supported by a huge amount of procedures and policies, which they have to apply and evidence to be considered as providing a good standard of care by the governmental inspection bodies. Attention to appropriate procedures is a necessary part of the work, but should not become its basis (Petrie et al. 2009). In the UK there is some form of guidance for nearly every possible situation, event and circumstance. New developments, like the rise of e-cigarettes or tablet computers, are answered with new procedures and/or policies to be followed by all employees.

In social pedagogy, every situation is seen in its uniqueness, which requires a unique response. “The professionalism of the worker, transparency of practice, a commitment to team work and accountability to others in the team, are seen as the best guarantee of child safety” (Petrie et al. 2009:7). There is a holistic understanding of care and development, by bringing different theories together in a journey of permanent learning. This contrasts with a way of working based on the idea that ‘one model fits everyone’. Moreover, pathologising approaches have come to dominate social work practice in the UK (Lonne et al, 2009; Munro, 2011). Social pedagogy uses a variety of models and theories and brings a holistic approach to the table, considering the individual needs in interaction with the wider context, the environment and the specific circumstances. As a result, outcomes are established from synchronic and diachronic analysis, where everything is seen as interconnected and practice is sustained by meaningful relationships. This way of working supports children’s development and empowerment, acquiring a set of emotional, social and life skills that will impact positively in their wellbeing and will help them to achieve a fulfilling independence in the future.
 


Social pedagogues would regard the process to be equally important as the final outcomes. They believe that when the process is effective then outcomes are likely to be beneficial, it is not possible to disentangle the two (Smith, 2012). When the outcomes are looked at in a compartmentalised manner, treated separately in measurements that evidence different areas of the child development, the process can easily become a box ticking exercise, with a strong focus in documenting and measuring the final output. Instead of documentation, recording and measurement, the use of self-reflection and self-awareness are the key skills of the work in social pedagogy. At the same time, every work place requires documentation and recording, this is a very useful tool to monitor and reflect on the process, but as mentioned above, it should not be the main part of the work. There is not a ‘tool box’ or a policy that tells you what to do in each circumstance, the professionals use reflection on an ongoing basis, thus there are not universal solutions and mistakes become learning opportunities. In social pedagogy, conflicts are considered an important part of the journey, an inevitable part of it, not something to be avoided. They represent a necessity for progress because they bring a chance to grow, develop, change what is not working and gain new learning that can be useful for the future (Kleipoedszus, 2011).

Social pedagogues are equipped throughout their studies with a wide range of theories from social and educational science, as well as creative/practical activities they can engage in with their clients. These range from art therapy to outdoor education. British social work students learn to use different tools like the ‘Three Houses Child Protection Risk Assessment Tool’ from the Signs of Safety Approach (Bunn, 2013). These tools are used for example to collect the views of a young person on events in her life in a child friendly way. They are mostly used in only one session. It takes considerably longer to undertake for example a process of creative work or an outdoor activity with a client. Social pedagogues noticed that their British colleagues’ workloads did not enable them to engage with clients in such an intense form of intervention. In addition, due to the financial climate and current financial crisis funding was limited for activities (Local Government Association, 2014).

Another difference is the compartmentalisation of responsibilities in working with clients, per example social workers only writing assessments or only supporting approved foster carers, which can build barriers in applying the holistic working approach of social pedagogy.

Nevertheless, the experience of the HHH programme proved that it is possible to integrate a social pedagogical approach within the way of working in the British system. The social pedagogues experienced that when working in an equal partnership with their social worker colleagues they could reach a well-planned and clear-shared structure. Everyone knew what was expected from them, there was a framework where the flexibility and holistic perspective of a social pedagogical approach could thrive. When there was trust within the team, clarity would stem from that, and there was openness for the reflective and creative elements of social pedagogy.

It is worth mentioning that there are areas in the UK foster care practice that were considered very valuable by the HHH social pedagogues. One is the use of interdisciplinary panels to, for example, evaluate the quality of matching processes[3], another is the importance of having delegated authority[4] in place for each foster child, and in Scotland through ‘Getting it right for every child’ with its strong focus in the wellbeing of children. These are many examples of how social pedagogy fits with existing policies and how British ideas and conditions can nurture a social pedagogical way of thinking.
 

Relationships at the centre of practice

In the wider Anglophone context, there has been a tendency to a strict delineation of personal and professional relationships. Consequently, the importance of relationships became hidden behind increasing recourse to technical and managerial ways of working. However, recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in relationally based practice in the social work literature (Smith, 2012). Some authors go further in using the notion of ‘relational practice’ described as ‘being in relationship’, which is different than, and preferable to ‘having a relationship’ (Garfat, 2008).

Being in relationship means that we have what it takes to remain open and responsive in conditions where most mortals and professionals quickly distance themselves, become ‘objective’ and look for the external ‘fix’.” (Fewster, G. 2004 cited in Garfat, 2008: 7).

In this context of an increased acknowledgement of the importance of relationships shared by the UK foster care with social pedagogical thinking, there is a need to be able to put relationships at the centre of practice by setting the value and quality of the relationships at the heart of what we do. Munro (2011) argued that the necessary centrality of relationships for high quality child protection practice had become obscured in organisationally driven, rational technical approaches in social work.

The experiences in enhancing relationships in social pedagogy practice from the HHH programme exemplify what Claire Cameron’s paper ‘Cross-National Understandings of the Purpose of Child-Professional Relationships’ identifies as the four different purposes in how social pedagogues conceptualise relationships:

Supporting a child in developing skills and a sense of self; creating the conditions for an ethical encounter between the professional and the child, characterised by ‘being there’ for the child; providing opportunities for the child to be involved in decision-making and democratic processes; and gaining an understanding of the child’s lifeworld and the challenges experienced by the child.” (Cameron 2013 cited in Eichsteller & Petrie, 2013:1).

Social pedagogy as a child-centred and strength based approach focuses on the process and meeting the children where they are at, without being prescriptive and setting the starting point on where the child should be. In procedural driven practices, the foster carers/residential workers would apply their ‘tool box’. They would do things ‘to’ the child in order to achieve the outcomes that the professional team has established often based on where the child ‘should be at’. Social pedagogy instead suggests doing things ‘with’ the child for building a positive and meaningful relationship, supporting the child or young person to develop their own journey in care and beyond.
 

Conclusion

The HHH’s social pedagogues advocate for merging social pedagogy with the UK system; at organisational level by looking for a major balance between control and trust, as well as between the different roles and by sharing responsibility in decision making processes. This would be a prerequisite to dilute or minimise the impact that the culture of blame can have in how decisions are made in the system around the child, which affects all hierarchical layers. The dilemma lays on the fact that where there is a blame culture the system becomes reactive, and there is no room for learning or reflecting, so how could it be possible to make it better in order to avoid the same mistakes in the future? The social work profession has developed a ‘fear of failure’ and as professionals, they experience vulnerabilities with far reaching implications (Shoesmith, 2016). When the responsibility of the decisions are shared by the whole system – the professionals as well as the client - mistakes or problems are shared and can be seen as learning opportunities, each situation can be carefully analysed, thus solutions and consensus can be found.

In the United Kingdom as well as in continental European countries the pursuit is that children in care can thrive and have an environment that allows them to be able to experience similar levels of wellbeing as the rest of the children in society. The social pedagogues from the HHH programme argue the ‘what’ is the same; what differs is the ‘how’. A social worker who participated in the HHH programme expressed this as follows: “what I have valued from working within a social pedagogy model is how it enables you to focus on the quality of the relationships on a personal basis and also within the wider agency. Also how it uses a creative and holistic approach that puts the young people at the heart of the interventions”. The holistic approach, valuing the process so the way becomes also the solution, being action focused and strength based are fundamental aspects in social pedagogical thinking. Merging the two ways of working proved as not just possible in the different agencies who were part of the HHH programme, moreover, in some of them has become integrated in their way of working and has changed their organisations deeply.
 


Many organisations, academics and practitioners have been striving to introduce social pedagogy in the UK during the last years. A product of their work is that social pedagogy has become a relevant working practice on the agenda of an increasing number of organisations and local authorities around the country. Great effort and commitment will still be necessary at many levels to take social pedagogy forward and to see it becoming an integrated discipline in the social and educational fields in the UK in the future.

 



Acknowledgements

The paper has been writing with contributions and feedback from the HHH social pedagogues Marta Blanco, Stefanie Dorotka, Martina Elter, Manja Golobic, Rute Gonçalves, Christina Ketzer, Anne Kunz, Niina Robinson and Christine Spurk. Special thanks to Svend Bak, Lotte Junker Harbor, Liliana Santos and Jutta Weber for their support.
 



References and Bibliography

Ainsworth, F.; Thoburn, J. (2013). An exploration of the differential use of residential child care across national boundaries. In International Journal of Social Welfare, volume 23, number 1, p. 16-24. Retrieved from link [05.10.2016]

Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Moss, P. (2006). Care Work: Present and Future. London: Routledge

Bunn, A. (2013). Signs of Safety in England. NSPCC. Retrieved from link [9.11.2016]

Cameron, C.; Petrie, P.; Wigfall, V.; Kleipoedszus, S.; Jasper, A. (2011). Final report of the social pedagogy pilot programme: development and implementation. London: Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. Retrieved from link [26.03.2016]

Cameron, C. (2013). Cross-national Understandings of the Purpose of Professional-child Relationships: Towards a Social Pedagogical Approach. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 2, number 1, p. 3-16. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Cameron, C. (2016). Social Pedagogy in the UK today: findings from evaluations of training and development initiatives. In Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, volume 27, p. 199-223. DOI: 10.7179/PSRI_2016.27.10 Retrieved from: link

Doyle, M. E.; Smith, M. K. (2007). Jean-Jacques Rousseau on education, the Encyclopaedia of informal education. Retrieved from link  [21.05.2016]

Eichsteller, G.; Petrie, P (2013). Editorial: Relationships that Matter.In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 2, number 1, p. 1-2. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Eichsteller, G.; Holthoff, S. (2011). Social Pedagogy as an Ethical Orientation towards Working with People – Historical Perspectives. In Children Australia, volume 36, number 4. link Retrieved from link [27.10.1016]

Eichsteller, G.; Holthoff, S. (2012). The Art of being a Social Pedagogue. Developing Cultural Change in Children’s Homes in Essex. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 1, number 1. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Entwistle, H. (1970). Child-Centred Education. London: Routledge

Garfat, T (2008). The inter-personal in between: An exploration of relational child and youth care practice. In G. Belleville & F. Ricks (Eds), Standing of the precipice: Inquiry into the creative potential of child and youth care practice (pp. TBA). Edmonton. AB: MacEwan Press

Griffin, E. (2014). Child Labour. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016]

James, A.; Prout, A. (2015). Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood: Contemporary issues in the sociological study of childhood. Abbingdon: Routledge

Kleipoedszus, S. (2011). Communication and conflict: An important part of social pedagogic relationships. In Cameron, C.; Moss, P. (Ed.) In Social pedagogy and working with children and young people, p. 125-140. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Local Government Association (2014). Under pressure: How councils are planning for future cuts. Retrieved from link [09.11.2016]

Lonne, B.; Parton, N.; Thomson,J.; Harries,M (2009) Reforming Child Protection. Oxon: Routledge.

Engel, P (2016). Interview with Reinhard Merkel about the topic “philosophy of law”. In: Der Tag (18:00 – 19:00), HR2, [03.02.2016]

Milligan, I. (2011). Resisting risk-averse practice: the contribution of social pedagogy. Children Australia, volume 36, number 4, p. 207 - 213. link [04.05.2016]

Moss, P. (2010). What is Your Image of the Child? In UNESCO Policy Brief on Early Childhood. Number 47. United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Retrieved from link [21.11.2016]

Moss, P.; Cameron, C. (2011). Social Pedagogy and Working with Children and Young People: Where Care and Education Meet. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Munro, E. (2011). The Munro Review of Child Protection: Final Report: A Child-Centred System. London: Department of Education. Retrieved from link [06.04.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Heptinstall, E.; McQuail, S.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2005) Pedagogy - a holistic, personal approach to work with children and young people, across services: European models for practice, training, education and qualification. Unpublished briefing paper, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education University of London. Retrieved from: link [11.04.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; and Cameron, C.; Heptinstall, E.; McQuail, S.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2009). Pedagogy - a holistic, personal approach to work with children and young people, across services: European models for practice, training, education and qualification. Updated briefing paper, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education. University of London. Retrieved from: link [28.05.2016]

Petrie, P.; Chambers, H. (2009). Richer lives: creative activities in the education and practice of Danish pedagogues: a preliminary study. A preliminary study: report to Arts Council England. London: Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education. University of London. Retrieved from: link [12.11.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2006). Working with Children in Care: European perspectives. Buckingham: Open University Press

Richardson, R. (2014). Foundlings, orphans and unmarried mothers. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016].

Shoesmith, S. (2016). Learning from Baby P. The politics of blame, fear and denial. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Smith, M. K. (2001, 2007) ‘The learning organization’, the encyclopedia of informal education. Infed. Retrieved from link [22.05.2016]

Smith, M. (2012). Social Pedagogy from a Scottish Perspective. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 1, number 1, p. 46-55. Retrieved from link [18.10.2016]

Stein, P. B. (2007). Being the Change: Becoming Agents of Personal and Cultural Transformation. Doctorate Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute

Storø, J. (2013). Social Pedagogy Practice. Bristol: Policy Press

Thiersch, H. (2005): Lebensweltorientierte Soziale Arbeit. Aufgaben der Praxis im sozialen Wan-del. 6. Aufl. Weinheim, München, Juventa

White, M. (2014). Juvenile crime in the 19th century. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016]

 


 

Contacto:

Verónica, para contactar: veroevapc@gmail.com

Simon, para contactar: simonjohr@gmx.de

 


 

NOTA: Versión en lengua castellana
 

Pedagogía Social y Trabajo Social en el Reino Unido:

El encuentro de dos culturas visto desde una perspectiva europea continental
 

Verónica Pérez, educadora social, formadora y consultora asociada con Jacaranda Development.

Simon Thomas Johr, pedagogo social en Adopción y en el Equipo de Reclutamiento y y Formación en Acogida, Ayuntamiento del condado de Staffordshire.

 

Resumen

El objetivo de este artículo es comprender cómo la pedagogía social podría integrarse dentro del sector profesional de lo social en el Reino Unido. Se analiza la relación de la pedagogía social con el del trabajo social a través de la experiencia única que tuvieron las pedagogas y los pedagogos sociales de diferentes partes de Europa[5] durante la realización del programa Head, Heart, Hands (HHH),[6] ’Cabeza, corazón y manos’ dirigido por The Fostering Network.[7] El objetivo del programa era demostrar cómo la introducción de la pedagogía social en el acogimiento podría tener un impacto positivo en los servicios de protección británicos. La pedagogía social se esfuerza por comprender el contexto sociológico y cómo este puede influir en la práctica profesional, afectar a nuestro pensamiento, a nuestras acciones y a las de otros. El hilo común es explorar el encuentro entre las dos culturas que tuvo lugar durante el desarrollo del programa a nivel nacional, y el aprendizaje y las reflexiones que se derivan de él. Para inspirar y beneficiar a la amplia gama de profesionales que trabajan en el campo de la atención social en general y del acogimiento en particular, proporcionando elementos para la reflexión e ideas concretas sobre cómo la pedagogía social puede integrarse con el trabajo social para contribuir a mejorar la calidad de la atención en el Reino Unido.

 

 

El punto de partida del documento es definir la pedagogía social en el contexto del programa HHH; después se examinan los diferentes orígenes sociales respecto a la protección a la infancia en los dos modelos de sociedad en cuestión, reflexionando sobre algunas de sus similitudes y diferencias, así como los diferentes niveles de profesionalización en la atención a la infancia en ambas tradiciones. A continuación se describen los hallazgos que servirían para apoyar la fusión de las dos formas de trabajo, para reforzar algunas prácticas actuales de trabajo social y ofrecer nuevas interpretaciones de mejora de la calidad de la atención en el Reino Unido.

Los hallazgos de este artículo se complementarán con un documento futuro que se centrará en los aspectos empíricos y los aprendizajes del programa HHH: "Pedagogía social en el Reino Unido. Una experiencia en acogimiento. Reflexiones sobre el aprendizaje del Programa Head, Heart, Hands”.
 

Breve descripción de la pedagogía social en el contexto del Programa HHH

La pedagogía social y el trabajo social tienen en común que son profesiones que atraen a personas que tiene una fuerte vocación hacia la defensa de la justicia social; a menudo la profesión es un ‘llamado’. Hay una motivación ética para unirse a la profesión con el fin de construir una sociedad diferente y hacer que el mundo sea más justo.

La definición de pedagogía social de las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales del programa HHH se basa en la creencia, la comprensión y el conocimiento de que se puede cambiar positivamente o influir en situaciones desfavorecidas a través de prácticas educativas. Dentro de las técnicas educativas utilizadas, la figura profesional es consciente de que ella misma es la ‘herramienta’ principal en su trabajo. Esto requiere ser una persona crítica y autorreflexiva, ser consciente de sus propios valores, creencias y sus propios desencadenantes emocionales. Esto significa que la la pedagoga o pedagogo tienen un Haltung consistente y claro, que no solo es parte de su vida profesional individual, sino también una parte de su personalidad. La palabra alemana Haltungse traduce aproximadamente como postura, ethos o mentalidad y se refiere a la medida en que una persona guía sus acciones desde la ética y vive según sus valores en la vida cotidiana’ (Eichsteller & Holthoff, 2011). Haltung describe cómo nuestras acciones y nuestro pensamiento están guiados por nuestras convicciones y también significa que la /el profesional necesita ser congruente / auténtico para ser creíble. Se tratará de intervenir lo menos posible, pero tanto como sea necesario para obtener una comprensión del mundo, de la vida de la persona con la que se actúa (Thiersch, 2005). Bajo este supuesto, tiene como objetivo trabajar basándose en las fortalezas, las cuales empoderan a la persona usuaria, y utilizar un enfoque holístico, que considere tanto a la persona como al sistema que le rodea. Siguiendo este razonamiento, la pedagoga y el pedagogo social deben mostrar respeto, confianza, aceptación incondicional, la creencia de que todos los seres humanos son iguales con un potencial rico y extraordinario, y considerarlos competentes, ingeniosos y agentes activos. Tiene una conciencia del sistema y de la cultura en la que se encuentra más amplia, y ve el trabajo en interdependencia con la sociedad.

En relación con la relevancia que el sistema tiene en la pedagogía social, el artículo explorará ahora las características principales de la atención a la infancia en Gran Bretaña, en contraste con las de la Europa continental.
 

1. Comprender el desarrollo en la protección a la infancia en las tradiciones anglosajona y continental europea: la influencia de la sociedad y la cultura

"No puede haber una revelación más intensa del alma de una sociedad, que la forma en que trata a su infancia”. Nelson Mandela


La visión de la infancia y su socialización.

Existen similitudes fundamentales entre las sociedades de la Europa continental por cómo protegen a su infancia y adolescencia más vulnerable. El Reino Unido tiene una larga tradición en el trabajo social, mientras que dentro de la Europa continental la tradición se ha desarrollado además en la pedagogía social. Tanto en uno como en otro, la seguridad y el bienestar están en el centro de la legislación y la práctica laboral. Pero al mismo tiempo, existen diferencias en la forma de socializar y educar a la infancia y a la juventud entre los países de la Europa continental y en lo que se considera el enfoque principal en el Reino Unido. Estas diferencias se relacionan principalmente con diferentes construcciones sociales de la 'imagen de la infancia'. Esto último se refiere a qué tipo de valor tiene la infancia y la juventud en su sociedad y con qué expectativas y aspiraciones viven. La atención prestada a esta idea ha ido variando, por ejemplo la sociología del desarrollo infantil, es importante en algunos ámbitos, pero rara vez se reconoce en otros, incluida la formulación de políticas. La imagen de la infancia en un lugar y tiempo determinado es una construcción social "siempre presente e influyente, pero en la formulación de políticas, por lo general se da por sobreeentendida y, por lo tanto, no se debate sobre ello" (Moss, 2010).

Para comprender las diferentes visiones culturales del valor que la sociedad le otorga a su infancia y juventud, es importante volver a la revolución industrial para rastrear el comienzo de los cambios en la forma en que se entiende y se ve la infancia / niñez en la Europa moderna. Esto está estrechamente relacionado con el desarrollo de la escolarización en los diferentes países.

Como país en el que comenzó el irreversible proceso transformacional de la industrialización, el Reino Unido experimentó grandes cambios sociales y económicos que dieron lugar a una nueva gama de problemas sociales, algunos de los cuales afectaron principalmente a su infancia y adolescencia. Tales como el trabajo infantil (Griffin, 2016), la delincuencia juvenil (White, 2016), la pobreza, especialmente entre la clase trabajadora, y la soledad (Richardson, 2016). A lo largo de los siglos XVIII y XIX surgió una nueva mentalidad en la Europa continental. Las escuelas y la educación formal se extendieron, y varios personalidades de la filosofías y de la educación comenzaron a contemplar los propósitos y el contenido de la educación de la juventud, centrándose en la naturaleza y las necesidades de la infancia, y desarrollando una comprensión holística progresiva del crecimiento y el aprendizaje. Uno de esos pensadores y filósofos fue Jean-Jacques Rousseau. En su libro "Emilio o De la pedagogía" (1762), Rousseau exploró el impacto de la socialización y la enseñanza académica en la ‘naturaleza intrínsecamente buena’ de la infancia (Doyle y Smith, 2007).

La pedagogía y la protección a la infancia en la Europa continental se construyeron y guiaron por principios como la agencia individual, la libertad y la autodisciplina (Entwistle, 1970). La pedagogía social influyó en este desarrollo. Personalidades educativas, de la política y reformadores sociales se han basado en estos procesos que se centraron en lo siguiente: la idea de considerar a la persona menor como agente activa en su desarrollo; la necesidad de entender a cada menor como un ser completo; la importancia de entornos apropiados donde puedan desarrollar todo su potencial; y el papel vital de un abordaje individualizado y holístico que se preocupe por el bienestar general y los logros de cada menor. Los conceptos que hoy se consideran esencialmente socioeducativos influyeron en cómo se construyeron la educación y la protección a la infancia en los países de la Europa continental.

Este cambio cultural forma parte de la construcción de una imagen de la infancia como ingeniosa, creativa, activa y capaz; de las niñas y los niños como agentes activos de sus propias vidas, siendo respetados tanto por sus dificultades como por sus talentos, lo que contribuye a su ‘sentido de agencia’ (Stein, 2007). En los sistemas de bienestar recién formados y los servicios de protección infantil, estos puntos de vista significaban la prevalencia de planteamientos centrados en las fortalezas, con una orientación preventiva en su base. Un ejemplo de esto puede encontrarse en el trabajo de Loris Malaguzzi, fundador de las escuelas infantiles municipales en Italia, que tenía en esencia una filosofía pedagógica para los primeros años donde se conceptualizaba la infancia como agentes ‘ricos’, competentes y activos, argumentando que "La niñez tiene 'cien lenguajes’, cien manos, cien pensamientos, cien maneras de pensar, de jugar, de hablar" (Malaguzzi, citado en Edwards, Gandini y Forman, 1998, citado en Moss y Cameron, 2011: 37).

El uso de la palabra ‘educación’ en Europa continental, se relaciona con el apoyo global al desarrollo infantil, mientras que el componente ‘social’ se refiere al papel y la responsabilidad de la sociedad en esta tarea. En la pedagogía, la atención social y la educación, en sus significados formales e informales, se encuentran y están intrínsecamente relacionados.

 "Para decirlo de otra manera, la pedagogía trata de educar a la infancia, es 'educación’ en el sentido más amplio de esa palabra. De hecho, en francés y en otros idiomas con una base latina (como el italiano y el español) términos como ‘educación’ transmiten este sentido más amplio, y son intercambiables con las nociones ampliadas de pedagogía utilizadas en los países germánicos y nórdicos" (Petrie et al, 2009: 3).

 Esta visión de la infancia, influenciada por un pensamiento más pedagógico social, puede contrastarse con lo que ha prevalecido generalmente en los contextos culturales anglosajones, donde ha imperado una visión más problemática de la infancia, en general las personas menores son consideradas como diferentes teniendo que comportarse como adultas tan pronto como sea posible. Cuando están bajo la protección del estado o provienen de entornos económica y socialmente desfavorecidos, la infancia es vista comúnmente como traumatizada, discapacitada e incluso delincuente. Una visión creada por un enfoque centrado en el problema dentro de la educación formal y los entornos de protección institucionalizada, con una orientación principalmente curativa, es decir, restaurar a cada menor a su yo natural, y obediente (James y Prout, 2015).

La legislación británica de fines del siglo XIX y principios del siglo XX, que todavía sigue influyendo en la legislación actual, reforzó el hecho de que la infancia:

"no eran agentes 'libres'; llamó la atención sobre la relación paterno-filial esperando que se ejerciera control y disciplina; y enfatizó el peligro de que aquella que necesita ‘cuidado y protección’ se vuelva delincuente "(Walvin, 1982 y mayo, 173; en James y Prout, 2015: 43).

La protección residencial y de acogida en el Reino Unido pone el énfasis en la seguridad y la salud de las y los menores, con el objetivo principal de dotarles de habilidades esenciales para la vida como proceso normalizado -similar al de la infancia que no están en el sistema de protección-, centrándose en lograr buenos resultados. En particular, se considera que la vida familiar, la salud y la educación son los factores clave para la integración futura de la infancia y la adolescencia, de esta manera serán plenamente capaces de contribuir positivamente a la sociedad. El dilema se basa en la naturaleza sobreprotectora de muchos entornos de acogida y residenciales tal como se puso de manifiesto durante el programa HHH. A menudo se observó una orientación y práctica profesional con cierta aversión al riesgo (Milligan, 2011), que brinda oportunidades limitadas para que las y los menores crezcan y se desarrollen de la misma manera que sus iguales que no están en protección. Tienen posibilidades muy restringidas para experimentar iniciativas que respalden su confianza frente a los desafíos diarios. Esto también dificulta el proceso de adquirir habilidades provechosas para una transición exitosa a la independencia y a la vida adulta en el futuro.

Por otro lado, un marco socioeducativo enfatiza el aprendizaje facilitado por las actividades y acontecimientos de la vida cotidiana, con los riesgos apropiados para cada edad como oportunidades para una nueva comprensión y descubrimiento. Esto no está establecido de antemano, sino que ocurre de manera espontánea, ya que se estimula a cada menor a ayudarse a sí misma/o, a ser personas compasivas y empáticas, a trabajar en equipo, aprendiendo las habilidades clave que necesitarán para su vida futura como personas adultas interdependientes y autónomas. Desde una perspectiva socieducativa, hablamos de la noción de la infancia ‘rica’ (Malaguzzi, citado en Moss y Cameron, 2011), en contraste con la infancia ‘necesitada’ de los discursos dominantes de bienestar infantil en el Reino Unido, la pedagogía social se centra en las fortalezas y potencialidades, en lugar de los déficits (Smith, 2012).
 

Profesionalización en la atención a la infancia

Otra área que puede ampliar este análisis es la del sector profesional de la atención a la infancia, y cómo se ha construido de manera diferente en países que tienen una tradición en pedagogía social, en comparación con aquellos que no tienen el planteamiento pedagógico como parte de las bases de sus sistemas de bienestar. En la mayoría de los países de la Europa continental, encontramos profesionales de la pedagogía social -en algunos países conocidos como educadoras y educadores sociales-, dentro de los equipos multidisciplinares en las diferentes áreas del sistema de servicios sociales. Por ejemplo, en la atención temprana, en el trabajo con jóvenes, en el trabajo en centros de protección, escuelas, en recursos para adultos con discapacidades físicas o de aprendizaje, en el trabajo con grupos desfavorecidos, en apoyo a las personas mayores o incluso en el sector empresarial, como ayuda al bienestar del equipo profesional.

La diferencia contextual en el sector profesional es que en muchos países europeos continentales es más común la existencia de acogimientos residenciales para la infancia y la adolescencia en protección; con el acogimiento familiar coexistiendo a la par, pero en mucha menor medida de lo que se usa en el Reino Unido, donde la acogida familiar es una fórmula común de atención para la mayoría de menores que ingresan en el sistema de protección. Podemos ver esto al comparar el porcentaje de menores que se encuentran en acogimiento residencial en cuatro países: Inglaterra, 14% (en 2010); Dinamarca, 47% (en 2007); Alemania, 54% (en 2005); Italia, 48% (en 2007) (Ainsworth y Thoburn, 2013). Es importante señalar que la percepción y el contexto de los servicios residenciales en Europa varían. En la mayoría de los países europeos continentales, las figuras profesionales de servicios residenciales tienen títulos universitarios en ciencias sociales o educativas (por ejemplo, pedagogía/educación social u otras disciplinas relevantes como psicología, magisterio o trabajo social) y están plenamente formados antes de empezar a trabajar con la población vulnerable. Los servicios a menudo se consideran como ayuda en lugar de 'último recurso' o 'castigo por mal comportamiento'. Alemania tiene variedad de tipologías de acogimientos temporales, de ahí los diferentes roles de madres/padres acogedores. Si se desea proporcionar una atención especializada para menores con necesidades educativas especiales, la persona debe estar formada. Sin embargo, esto no se aplica a las madres y padres acogedores en general.

En el momento actual, el sistema del Reino Unido no requiere tener formación específica para ser familia acogedora o profesional en un centro residencial. Los requisitos de aprobación para convertirse en madre o padre de acogida son estándares nacionales mínimos; que las personas solicitantes deben demostrar que pueden cumplir y demostrar. Después de esto, todas las madres y padres de acogida tienen que completar el ‘Training Support and Development Standards for Foster Care’ TSD, (Normas de apoyo y desarrollo para el acogimiento temporal) de cumplimiento obligado durante de los doce meses posteriores a su aprobación. Además de estos requisitos nacionales y la TSD, cada organización / agencia / servicio establece sus propias prioridades en términos del conocimiento que requieren que sus profesionales tengan, generalmente en relación con modelos o enfoques específicos. En la experiencia del programa HHH, algunas de las más comunes fueron las teorías de apego y las prácticas restaurativas. Este conocimiento específico se ofrece a través de cursos u otras oportunidades de aprendizaje. Escocia está en proceso de incorporar formación obligatoria para el personal de acogida y el Consejo Escocés de Servicios Sociales está en proceso de revisar e incorporar formación obligatoria para el personal residencial. En el momento de escribir este artículo, todavía no se ha establecido.

"La investigación demostró que, en Inglaterra, la infancia en acogimiento residencial tiene antecedentes más graves y complejos que en los otros países estudiados. Sin embargo, la formación y educación de profesionales en Inglaterra se encuentra en un nivel mucho más bajo que en esos países " (Petrie et al, 2005: 5).

 

Fuente: Elaboración propia.


2. La integración de las dos formas de trabajar en la práctica

Esta parte del artículo explorará la integración de los dos enfoques culturales, centrándose en cómo la pedagogía social y el trabajo social pueden contribuir conjuntamente a la calidad de la atención en el Reino Unido. En primer lugar, analiza cómo se entiende la calidad de la atención en el contexto británico, y luego investiga la relevancia de la existencia de una base de valores compartidos por el equipo profesional. A continuación, se analiza cómo se pueden armonizar los niveles organizativos y gerenciales bajo una línea de trabajo socioeducativa. La parte final se dedica a explorar cómo pueden integrarse en la práctica los diferentes planteamientos socioeducativos sobre los procesos y los resultados, y el papel fundamental de las relaciones.
 

Calidad de la atención: ¿qué es?

No hay una definición compartida de la calidad de la atención en el contexto británico. Como se mencionó anteriormente, estar acreditado como profesional de acogida depende del cumplimiento de los estándares mínimos nacionales y los criterios establecidos por cada organización o agencia. El resultado de esta diversidad es la existencia de múltiples definiciones de lo que hace que la atención a la infancia sea de buena calidad o de lo que se necesita para trabajar con menores. Una vez dicho esto, existen algunas características comunes ya que hay un gran porcentaje de organizaciones que utilizan la formación ‘Skills to Foster’ (Habilidades de Acogimiento) proporcionada por ‘The Fostering Network’ y, a menudo, las herramientas de evaluación de la Coram BAAF (Academia de Adopción y Acogida) ofreciendo un planteamiento más uniforme al proceso previo a la acreditación, lo que significa que la formación tiene un nivel muy similar en todas estas organizaciones. Al mismo tiempo, la institución británica de los paneles de acogida y adopción está compuesta por un equipo multidisciplinar, lo que permite ofrecer una visión consistente e integral para la acreditación del personal de acogida. Las organizaciones nacionales como ‘The Fostering Network’ y ‘Foster Talk’ permiten la conexión a través de sus campañas nacionales, recursos en línea actualizados y una línea de ayuda para madres y padres de acogida. Otro criterio unificador son las guías de referencia para los estándares de trabajo con la infancia: ‘Every Child Matters’ (Cada Menor Importa) para Inglaterra y ‘Getting it right for each child’ (Hacer las cosas bien para cada menor) en Escocia.

A partir de su experiencia en el programa de HHH, las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales descubrieron que al integrar la pedagogía social en la cultura de trabajo de las diferentes organizaciones involucradas, algunos elementos clave de este enfoque fueron particularmente útiles y se convirtieron en valiosos agentes de cambio. Algunos de estos elementos se analizan aquí, otros aspectos (como las diferentes estrategias hacia los riesgos, la relevancia de la práctica reflexiva) se analizarán en el artículo futuro mencionado.
 

La necesidad de una orientación ética: valores fundamentales compartidos

El personal socioeducativo considera importante compartir una escala de valores clara y unificada con aquellas personas con quienes trabajan, esto sirve como referencia para sostener y guiar la práctica del equipo de profesionales que comparten un ambiente de trabajo o responsabilidades profesionales con un grupo específico. Cuando el personal socioeducativo toma decisiones, debe tomar decisiones basadas en valores, combinadas con la teoría aplicada a la práctica a través de la acción reflexiva, y esto se hace a través del diálogo con otros, la persona usuaria y demás colegas o profesionales. Se trata más bien de ética y valores que de métodos y técnicas (Storø, 2013). Por lo tanto, la pedagogía social es una combinación de teoría, investigación y Haltung. Durante el programa HHH, las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales advirtieron de la necesidad de un mayor diálogo sobre los valores referenciales en la práctica. La falta de claridad en este aspecto a veces contribuyó a un cierto grado de inconsistencia que también fue resultado del desconcierto por los continuos cambios gubernamentales y las respectivas agendas políticas y financieras del sector.

Es relevante señalar que las trabajadores y trabajadores sociales cualificados en el Reino Unido tienen un código ético. A partir de la experiencia a lo largo del programa, se observó que puede haber diferentes interpretaciones de estos valores compartidos, o cómo ponerlos en práctica, o suposiciones del tipo ‘pensamos lo mismo'. El diálogo y la reflexión continua podrían ser recursos útiles para explorar esto más a fondo. Construir una base ética compartida es una de las mejores inversiones para el futuro que se puede hacer para apoyar la coherencia y la estabilidad en los procesos de toma de decisiones para la infancia en protección y sus familias.
 

Un cambio organizativo y gerencial: compartir la toma de decisiones

Pedagogas y pedagogos sociales valoran trabajar en organizaciones con jerarquías planas y tener una dirección inclusiva y democrática. Esto es llevado a la práctica por la dirección al buscar activamente las opiniones del equipo y que contribuyan en la toma de decisiones. Brindan espacio y recursos para co-crear procesos y alentar al equipo a ser autónomos. Se puede encontrar un ejemplo en algunos centros residenciales de la Europa continental "donde la norma es la toma de decisiones democráticas dentro de jerarquías relativamente planas, lo que permite al equipo asumir un mayor nivel de responsabilidad, acorde con sus cualificaciones" (Cameron et al., 2011: 9). Sin embargo, en pedagogía social también se reconoce la necesidad de dirección, de que alguien tome una decisión final. No es fácil encontrar el equilibrio adecuado entre la participación y la dirección del equipo. Lo ideal es que vayan de la mano.

Las decisiones importantes de toda la organización se toman a través del diálogo entre la dirección y el equipo de profesionales. Ambas partes se ayudan mutuamente a mantener vivos los principios básicos de la organización. Estos principios se resumen en el concepto de servicio escrito entre la dirección y el equipo. Esto no solo involucra a todo el equipo sino que también aumenta su disposición a ponerlo en práctica. En Gran Bretaña, las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales de HHH percibieron que la dirección y los principios de sus organizaciones frecuentemente los decidían desde gerencia y luego se los transmitían a todo el personal para que los realizaran. En algunas de las organizaciones no tuvieron ninguna participación. Esto hizo que a muchos miembros del personal les resultara difícil identificarse con estos valores, promoverlos activamente y hacerlos suyos.

Aceptar retos y contradicciones conduce a una comunicación más abierta, transparente y dialógica dentro del sistema al compartir la toma de decisiones por igual entre profesionales, familias acogedoras y menores. La participación de menores en la toma de decisiones es respetada en todo momento en el pensamiento socioeducativo, porque se trabaja de acuerdo con el principio de ayudar a las personas a ayudarse a sí mismas (Storø, 2013). En otras palabras, la pedagogía social trabaja para crear el contexto que facilita el empoderamiento. El personal socioeducativo explorará una amplia diversidad de estrategias para incluir la voz de la persona menor en los procesos de toma de decisiones sobre su vida. La figura profesional de la trabajadora o el trabador social de cada menor también se esforzará por hacer que se escuche la voz de cada joven en las decisiones que se toman sobre su vida. La principal diferencia es que, desde el punto de vista de las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales del programa HHH, el sistema no siempre permite poner sobre la mesa los deseos de la infancia, o los procesos de consulta y participación en la toma de decisiones pueden ser un ejercicio bastante simbólico. Esto también se aplica a la inclusión de los puntos de vista de madres y padres acogedores, particularmente cuando pueden ser sistemáticamente excluidos del proceso.
 

Aprendizaje y desarrollo: un proceso continuo

Un objetivo compartido en toda el área del acogimiento en el Reino Unido es poder retener al personal de acogida y al personal de trabajo social, y se espera que se desarrollen profesionalmente. Se constató que en el ámbito del acogimiento hay muchas oportunidades de formación disponibles para el personal de acogida y para el resto de profesionales. Mientras que una sede del progama HHH alentó al personal de acogida a escribir reflexiones sobre la formación a la que asistieron, la mayoría no comprobó si los conocimientos recién adquiridos se ponían en práctica y de qué manera. Existen grandes expectativas sobre cómo las madres y padres de acogida cumplen con los estándares de atención, pero al mismo tiempo, a menudo no se les considera profesionales en una posición de igualdad respecto al personal de trabajo social y otras figuras profesionales, se les exige ser muy flexibles y participar en lo que hacen, con el objetivo principal de demostrar los resultados que alcanzan las y los menores bajo su cuidado.

La pedagogía social puede hacer hincapié en la calidad del aprendizaje y la formación, estableciendo vínculos entre la teoría y la práctica a través de la reflexión, haciendo seguimiento a través de sesiones interactivas o ‘pruebas de realidad’ y revisando el conocimiento después. Esto promueve una mayor posibilidad de integrar cualquier aprendizaje que se haya fomentado en la práctica diaria. El aprendizaje y el desarrollo deben ser constantes. La experiencia en el programa muestra que esta estrategia de formación fomenta directamente la permanencia del personal de acogida y del equipo, ya que permite a las personas cometer errores y aprender de ellos. No hay una forma correcta o incorrecta de hacer las cosas o una solución universal para las dificultades, solo hay etapas en un periplo de aprendizaje, por lo tanto, no hay necesidad de culparse cuando algo va mal.

Cameron (2016), en su meta análisis sobre varios informes de evaluación, establece que las acciones de desarrollo de la pedagogía social ofrecen la oportunidad de que el lugar de trabajo se vea a sí mismo como una ‘organización de aprendizaje’, donde el equipo profesional es más reflexivo y da más tiempo y relevancia a su propio aprendizaje y al de la persona usuaria. La conceptualización de una organización del aprendizaje aquí se relaciona con que “la formación es valiosa, continua y más efectiva cuando se comparte y cada experiencia es una oportunidad para aprender” (Kerka citado en Smith, 2001, 2007).

 

Fuente: Elaboración propia.

 

El proceso es tan importante como los resultados

Existe un amplio reconocimiento sobre la relevancia de los resultados para supervisar y evaluar la calidad de la atención brindada en la práctica del acogimiento en el Reino Unido, así como en las tradiciones socioeducativas.

Sin embargo, el 'cómo' lograr esto difiere. En Europa continental, la idea de Immanuel Kant está ampliamente difundida en el planteamiento de trabajo. Su mensaje es que una acción se justifica si está de acuerdo con principios morales específicos, socialmente aprobados. Por el contrario, en el enfoque británico / estadounidense se da cierta libertad a profesionales e instituciones para seguir el criterio de que un buen resultado puede justificar incluso un proceso cuestionable (Merkel citado en Engel, 2016).

El sistema de servicios sociales británico puede ser altamente procedimental. La práctica laboral de cada profesional está respaldada por una gran cantidad de protocolos y normativas, que deben aplicar y demostrar para que los órganos de inspección gubernamentales los consideren como proveedores de un buen nivel de atención. El cumplimiento de los procedimientos apropiados es una parte necesaria del trabajo, pero no debe convertirse en su base (Petrie et al., 2009). En el Reino Unido existe alguna forma de orientación para casi todas las situaciones posibles, acciones y circunstancias. Los nuevos escenarios como el aumento de los cigarrillos electrónicos o las tablets, se satisfacen con nuevos protocolos y / o normativas que se deben seguir por todo el personal.

En pedagogía social, cada situación se ve en su singularidad, requiriendo una respuesta única. "La profesionalidad de la persona, la transparencia en la práctica, el compromiso con el trabajo en equipo y la responsabilidad con los demás miembros del equipo, se consideran la mejor garantía para la seguridad infantil" (Petrie et al., 2009: 7). Hay una comprensión holística de la atención y el desarrollo, al reunir diferentes teorías en el trayecto del aprendizaje permanente. Esto contrasta con una forma de trabajar basada en la idea de que ‘un modelo se adapta a todo el mundo’. Además, los enfoques de patologización han llegado a dominar la práctica del trabajo social en el Reino Unido (Lonne et al, 2009; Munro, 2011). La pedagogía social utiliza una variedad de modelos y teorías y aporta un enfoque holístico, considerando las necesidades individuales en interacción con el contexto más amplio, el entorno y las circunstancias específicas. En consecuencia, los resultados se establecen a partir del análisis sincrónico y diacrónico, donde todo se ve como interconectado y la práctica se sostiene mediante relaciones significativas. Esta forma de trabajar apoya el desarrollo y el empoderamiento de la infancia, adquiriendo un conjunto de habilidades emocionales, sociales y vitales que impactarán positivamente en su bienestar y les ayudarán a lograr una independencia plena en el futuro.

El personal socioeducativo considera el proceso como igual de importante que los resultados finales. Cree que cuando el proceso es efectivo, es probable que los resultados sean beneficiosos, no es posible separarlos (Smith, 2012). Cuando los resultados se analizan de manera compartimentada, se tratan por separado en mediciones que evidencian diferentes áreas del desarrollo infantil, el proceso puede convertirse fácilmente en un casillero, centrado en la documentación y en el valor del resultado final. En lugar de documentación, registro y medición, el uso de la autorreflexión y el autoconocimiento son las habilidades clave del trabajo en pedagogía social. Al mismo tiempo, cada lugar de trabajo requiere documentación y registro, esta es una herramienta muy útil para supervisar y reflexionar sobre el proceso, pero como se mencionó anteriormente, no debe ser la parte principal del trabajo. No hay una ‘caja de herramientas’ o una normativa que diga qué hacer en cada circunstancia, el personal socioeducativo utiliza la reflexión de forma continua, por lo que no hay soluciones universales y los errores se convierten en oportunidades de aprendizaje. En la pedagogía social, los conflictos se consideran una parte importante del proceso, una parte inevitable del mismo, no es algo que deba evitarse. Representan la necesidad de progreso porque brindan la oportunidad de crecer, desarrollarse, cambiar lo que no funciona y obtener nuevos aprendizajes que pueden ser útiles para el futuro (Kleipoedszus, 2011).

La formación en pedagogía social esta provista de un abanico de teorías de las ciencias sociales y educativas, así como actividades creativas / prácticas con las que poder involucrar a la persona usuaria. Estas van desde el arte terapia hasta la pedagogía en el tiempo libre. El estudiantado británico de trabajo social aprenden a usar diferentes herramientas como ‘Three Houses Child Protection Risk Assessment Tool’ (Herramienta de Evaluación de Riesgo de Protección a la Infancia en Tres Estancias) del enfoque ‘Signs of Safety’ (Señales de Seguridad) (Bunn, 2013). Estas herramientas se utilizan, por ejemplo, para recabar la opinión de una persona adolescente sobre los acontecimientos de su vida de una manera más cercana. Se usan principalmente en una sola sesión. Lleva mucho más tiempo llevar a cabo, por ejemplo, un proceso de trabajo creativo o una actividad al aire libre con la persona usuaria. Las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales se dieron cuenta de que las cargas de trabajo de sus colegas británicos no les permitían relacionarse con las personas usuarias en una forma tan intensa de intervención. Además, debido al clima financiero y de crisis, los fondos para actividades eran limitados (Local Government Association, 2014).

Otra diferencia es la compartimentación de responsabilidades al trabajar con un determinado grupo, por ejemplo, personal del trabajo social que solo evalúa a solicitantes acogedores para su aprobación, o en otros casos que solo apoya a las madres y padres acogedores una vez han sido aprobados, esto puede crear barreras para aplicar el abordaje de trabajo holístico de la pedagogía social.

Sin embargo, la experiencia del programa HHH demostró que es posible integrar un enfoque socioeducativo como forma de trabajo en el sistema británico. Las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales experimentaron que al trabajar de forma igualitaria con sus colegas de trabajo social podían alcanzar una estructura compartida bien planificada y clara. Todo el equipo sabía lo que se esperaba de su práctica, había un marco donde la flexibilidad y la perspectiva holística de un abordaje socioeducativo podía prosperar. Cuando había confianza dentro del equipo, la transparencia derivaba de ello, y había apertura hacia los elementos reflexivos y creativos de la pedagogía social.

Vale la pena mencionar que hay áreas en la práctica de la atención a la infancia en el Reino Unido que fueron consideradas muy valiosas por las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales del HHH. Una es el uso de comités interdisciplinarios para, por ejemplo, evaluar la calidad de los llamados ‘Matching processes’,[8] otra es la importancia de obtener “Delegated Authority’ (Autoridad Delegada) para cada menor en situación de acogida,[9] y en Escocia a través de la guía ‘Getting it right for each child’ con su fuerte enfoque en el bienestar de la infancia. Estos son algunos ejemplos de cómo la pedagogía social se ajusta a las normativas existentes y cómo las ideas y condiciones británicas pueden nutrirse de una forma de pensar socioeducativa.
 

Relaciones en el centro de la práctica

En el contexto anglófono más amplio ha habido una tendencia a una división estricta entre las relaciones personales y profesionales. Como consecuencia, la importancia de las relaciones quedó oculta detrás de formas de trabajo técnico y gerencial. Sin embargo, en los últimos años se ha observado un resurgimiento del interés por las relaciones en la práctica profesional en la literatura sobre trabajo social (Smith, 2012). Algunos autores van más allá al usar la noción de ‘práctica relacional’ descrita como ‘estar en relación’, que es diferente y preferible a ‘tener una relación’ (Garfat, 2008).

"Estar en relación significa que tenemos lo que se necesita para permanecer abiertos y receptivos en condiciones donde la mayoría de los mortales y profesionales se distancian rápidamente, se vuelven 'objetivos' y buscan soluciones externas". (Fewster, G. 2004 citado en Garfat, 2008: 7).

En este contexto, se puede ver cada vez más como la importancia de las relaciones en el sistema de acogida del Reino Unido coincide con un pensamiento socioeducativo: es necesario poder poner las relaciones en el centro de la práctica estableciendo el valor y la calidad relacional en el corazón de lo que hacemos. Munro (2011) argumentó que la centralidad necesaria de las relaciones en la práctica de protección infantil de alta calidad se había visto oscurecida por enfoques organizativos de planteamientos técnico-racionales dentro del trabajo social.

Las experiencias de mejora de las relaciones en la práctica a través de la pedagogía social que se observaron durante el programa HHH ejemplifican lo que el documento de Claire Cameron: Cross-National Understandings of the Purpose of Child-Professional Relationships, identifica como los cuatro propósitos en los cuales el personal socioeducativo conceptualiza las relaciones:

"Apoyar a cada menor en el desarrollo de habilidades y su identidad; crear las condiciones para un encuentro ético entre profesionales y menores, caracterizado por 'estar ahí' para la/el menor; brindar oportunidades para que la infancia participe en la toma de decisiones y en los procesos democráticos; y obtener una comprensión del mundo de la vida de cada menor y los retos que experimenta". (Cameron 2013 citado en Eichsteller & Petrie, 2013: 1).

La pedagogía social centrada en la infancia y en sus fortalezas, se basa en el proceso y el encuentro con la persona menor donde está, sin ser descriptiva y estableciendo el punto de partida en donde debería estar. En las prácticas impulsadas por los procedimientos, el personal de acogida y de trabajo residencial aplicaría su ‘caja de herramientas’. Actuarían ‘sobre la persona menor’ para lograr los resultados que el equipo profesional ha establecido a menudo en función de dónde piensan que el individuo debería estar. En cambio, la pedagogía social sugiere hacer cosas 'con la persona menor’ para construir una relación positiva y significativa, apoyándole para que desarrolle su propio camino en la experiencia de acogida y más allá.
 

Conclusión

Las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales del HHH abogan por fusionar la pedagogía social con el sistema del Reino Unido; a nivel organizacional, buscando un mayor equilibrio entre el control y la confianza, así como entre los diferentes roles y compartiendo la responsabilidad en los procesos de toma de decisiones. Esto sería un prerrequisito para diluir o minimizar el impacto que puede tener la cultura de la culpa en la forma en que se toman las decisiones en el sistema que rodea a la infancia en protección, lo que afecta a todas las capas jerárquicas. El dilema radica en el hecho de que cuando hay una cultura de culpa el sistema se vuelve reactivo, y no hay espacio para aprender o reflexionar, entonces, ¿cómo puede ser posible mejorarlo para evitar caer en los mismos errores en el futuro? La profesión del trabajo social ha desarrollado un ‘miedo al fracaso’ y como profesionales experimentan vulnerabilidades con implicaciones de largo alcance (Shoesmith, 2016). Cuando la responsabilidad de las decisiones es compartida por todo el sistema -profesionales y personas usuarias- los errores o problemas se comparten y se pueden ver como oportunidades de aprendizaje, cada situación puede analizarse cuidadosamente, por lo que se pueden encontrar soluciones y consensos.

Tanto en el Reino Unido como en los países de Europa continental, se persigue que la infancia en protección pueda prosperar y tener un entorno que les permita experimentar niveles de bienestar similares al resto de menores en la sociedad. Las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales del programa HHH argumentan que el ‘qué’ es lo mismo, lo que difiere es el ‘cómo’. Una trabajadora social que participó en el programa HHH lo expresó de la siguiente manera: "lo que valoré al trabajar dentro de un modelo socioeducativo es cómo te permite centrarte en la calidad de las relaciones a nivel personal y también dentro de una organización más amplia. También cómo utiliza un enfoque creativo y holístico que coloca a la juventud en el centro de las intervenciones”. El enfoque holístico, valorando el proceso para que el camino se convierta también en la solución, estar centrado en la acción y en las fortalezas son aspectos fundamentales en el pensamiento socieducativo. La fusión de las dos formas de trabajo resultó no solo posible en las diferentes organizaciones que formaron parte del programa HHH, además, en algunos de ellas se ha integrado en su forma de trabajar y las ha cambiado profundamente.

Muchas organizaciones, personalidades académicas y profesionales se han esforzado por introducir la pedagogía social en el Reino Unido durante los últimos años. Un producto de su esfuerzo es que la pedagogía social se ha convertido en una práctica de trabajo relevante en la agenda de un creciente número de organizaciones y autoridades locales en todo el país. Aún será necesario un gran esfuerzo y compromiso a muchos niveles para llevar adelante la pedagogía social y para que en el futuro se convierta en una disciplina integrada en el campo social y educativo del país.
 


 
   Agradecimientos:

El artículo ha contado con contribuciones y sugerencias de las pedagogas y pedagogos sociales que participaron en el programa HHH Marta Blanco, Stefanie Dorotka, Martina Elter, Manja Golobic, Rute Gonçalves, Christina Ketzer, Anne Kunz, Niina Robinson y Christine Spurk.
Muchas gracias a Svend Bak, Lotte Junker Harbor, Liliana Santos y Jutta Weber por su apoyo.
 



Referencias y Bibliografía

Ainsworth, F.; Thoburn, J. (2013). An exploration of the differential use of residential child care across national boundaries. In International Journal of Social Welfare, volume 23, number 1, p. 16-24. Retrieved from link [05.10.2016]

Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Moss, P. (2006). Care Work: Present and Future. London: Routledge

Bunn, A. (2013). Signs of Safety in England. NSPCC. Retrieved from link [9.11.2016]

Cameron, C.; Petrie, P.; Wigfall, V.; Kleipoedszus, S.; Jasper, A. (2011). Final report of the social pedagogy pilot programme: development and implementation. London: Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London. Retrieved from link [26.03.2016]

Cameron, C. (2013). Cross-national Understandings of the Purpose of Professional-child Relationships: Towards a Social Pedagogical Approach. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 2, number 1, p. 3-16. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Cameron, C. (2016). Social Pedagogy in the UK today: findings from evaluations of training and development initiatives. In Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, volume 27, p. 199-223. DOI: 10.7179/PSRI_2016.27.10 Retrieved from: link

Doyle, M. E.; Smith, M. K. (2007). Jean-Jacques Rousseau on education, the Encyclopaedia of informal education. Retrieved from link  [21.05.2016]

Eichsteller, G.; Petrie, P (2013). Editorial: Relationships that Matter.In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 2, number 1, p. 1-2. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Eichsteller, G.; Holthoff, S. (2011). Social Pedagogy as an Ethical Orientation towards Working with People – Historical Perspectives. In Children Australia, volume 36, number 4. link Retrieved from link [27.10.1016]

Eichsteller, G.; Holthoff, S. (2012). The Art of being a Social Pedagogue. Developing Cultural Change in Children’s Homes in Essex. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 1, number 1. Retrieved from link [24.11.2016]

Entwistle, H. (1970). Child-Centred Education. London: Routledge

Garfat, T (2008). The inter-personal in between: An exploration of relational child and youth care practice. In G. Belleville & F. Ricks (Eds), Standing of the precipice: Inquiry into the creative potential of child and youth care practice (pp. TBA). Edmonton. AB: MacEwan Press

Griffin, E. (2014). Child Labour. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016]

James, A.; Prout, A. (2015). Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood: Contemporary issues in the sociological study of childhood. Abbingdon: Routledge

Kleipoedszus, S. (2011). Communication and conflict: An important part of social pedagogic relationships. In Cameron, C.; Moss, P. (Ed.) In Social pedagogy and working with children and young people, p. 125-140. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Local Government Association (2014). Under pressure: How councils are planning for future cuts. Retrieved from link [09.11.2016]

Lonne, B.; Parton, N.; Thomson,J.; Harries,M (2009) Reforming Child Protection. Oxon: Routledge.

Engel, P (2016). Interview with Reinhard Merkel about the topic “philosophy of law”. In: Der Tag (18:00 – 19:00), HR2, [03.02.2016]

Milligan, I. (2011). Resisting risk-averse practice: the contribution of social pedagogy. Children Australia, volume 36, number 4, p. 207 - 213. link [04.05.2016]

Moss, P. (2010). What is Your Image of the Child? In UNESCO Policy Brief on Early Childhood. Number 47. United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation. Retrieved from link [21.11.2016]

Moss, P.; Cameron, C. (2011). Social Pedagogy and Working with Children and Young People: Where Care and Education Meet. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Munro, E. (2011). The Munro Review of Child Protection: Final Report: A Child-Centred System. London: Department of Education. Retrieved from link [06.04.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Heptinstall, E.; McQuail, S.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2005) Pedagogy - a holistic, personal approach to work with children and young people, across services: European models for practice, training, education and qualification. Unpublished briefing paper, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education University of London. Retrieved from: link [11.04.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; and Cameron, C.; Heptinstall, E.; McQuail, S.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2009). Pedagogy - a holistic, personal approach to work with children and young people, across services: European models for practice, training, education and qualification. Updated briefing paper, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education. University of London. Retrieved from: link [28.05.2016]

Petrie, P.; Chambers, H. (2009). Richer lives: creative activities in the education and practice of Danish pedagogues: a preliminary study. A preliminary study: report to Arts Council England. London: Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education. University of London. Retrieved from: link [12.11.2016]

Petrie, P.; Boddy, J.; Cameron, C.; Simon, A.; Wigfall, V. (2006). Working with Children in Care: European perspectives. Buckingham: Open University Press

Richardson, R. (2014). Foundlings, orphans and unmarried mothers. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016].

Shoesmith, S. (2016). Learning from Baby P. The politics of blame, fear and denial. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Smith, M. K. (2001, 2007) ‘The learning organization’, the encyclopedia of informal education. Infed. Retrieved from link [22.05.2016]

Smith, M. (2012). Social Pedagogy from a Scottish Perspective. In International Journal of Social Pedagogy, volume 1, number 1, p. 46-55. Retrieved from link [18.10.2016]

Stein, P. B. (2007). Being the Change: Becoming Agents of Personal and Cultural Transformation. Doctorate Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute

Storø, J. (2013). Social Pedagogy Practice. Bristol: Policy Press

Thiersch, H. (2005): Lebensweltorientierte Soziale Arbeit. Aufgaben der Praxis im sozialen Wan-del. 6. Aufl. Weinheim, München, Juventa

White, M. (2014). Juvenile crime in the 19th century. Discovering literature: Romantics and Victorians. British Library. Retrieved from link [20.05.2016]

 



Contacto:

Verónica, para contactar: veroevapc@gmail.com

Simon, para contactar: simonjohr@gmx.de

 

[1] Germany, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Finland, Austria, Sweden and Denmark

[2] To find more information about the Head, Heart, Hands programme’s go to: link

[3] Matching the child with a placement that matches their assessed needs.

[4] Delegated authority is the process that enables foster carers to make everyday decisions about the children and young people they care for, where that authority has been delegated to them by the local authority and/or the parents.

[5] Alemania, Portugal, Eslovenia, España, Finlandia, Austria, Suecia y Dinamarca.

[6] Para encontrar más información sobre el programa Head, Heard, Hands ir a: link  

[7] ‘The Fostering Network’ es una organización nacional de apoyo y asesoramiento sobre la acogida, ofrece diferentes servicios y recursos a las entidades que forman parte de la red.

[8] Colocar a cada menor con una familia de acogida que pueda dar respuesta a sus necesidades previamente identificadas.

[9] La Autoridad Delegada es el procedimiento que permite a la madre y/o padre acogedores tomar decisiones cotidianas sobre la persona menor que cuidan, cuando la autoridad local y / o la madre y / o padre biológicos las han delegado.

 


Comparte:

RES, Revista de Educación Social, es una publicación digital editada por el Consejo General de Colegios de Educadoras y Educadores Sociales (CGCEES). La Revista Res forma parte del proyecto EDUSO y se integra en el Portal de la Educación Social. res@eduso.net · www.eduso.net/res. ISSN 1698-9007.

Reconocimiento – NoComercial (by-nc): Se permite la generación de obras derivadas siempre que no se haga un uso comercial. Tampoco se puede utilizar la obra original con finalidades comerciales.

Lista de correo
Envíanos tu correo para recibir novedades de RES:

Código
Captcha